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The Princess and the Pea




Dewey: 741.5
This title covers these subjects:  Graphic novelsPrincesses -- FictionFairy tales

The Princess and the Pea: The Graphic Novel (Hardcover)

by Hans C Andersen

Stone Arch Books
As a young prince nears adulthood, the Queen tells him he must find a princess bride -- but not just any princess will do. Only a true princess will satisfy his mother. The young prince searches the entire kingdom, but returns home alone and sad. Late one stormy night, a mysterious woman knocks at the castle door. She claims to be a true princess, but the Queen has her doubts. So, she concocts a clever scheme to see if the princess is the real thing.


Reading Level: 1-3
Interest Level: 3-6
GRL: L
Lexile Level: GN 380L
Accelerated ReaderATOS Level: 2.8
AR Points: 0.5
AR Quiz Number: 130878

ISBN:  9781434215949 / 1-4342-1594-6
Publisher:  Stone Arch Books
Brand:  Graphic Spin
Copyright: 2010
Language: English
Page Count:  40
Page Dimensions:  7 x 10
Binding:  Reinforced Library Binding

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Reviews

Poisoned Rationality Blog - Lexie Cenni

This is a 3-in-1 review for the books: The Princess and the Pea, The Emperor's New Clothes and The Ugly Duckling The Ugly Duckling Summary: In a faraway land, perched upon her little nest, Mother Duck waits for her last remaining egg to hatch. When the odd little egg finally breaks open, Mother Duck is shocked to see an ugly duckling staring up at her. Despite its homeliness, Mother Duck adores her awkward child and does her best to protect him. Unfortunately, no one else on the farm wants anything to do with the Ugly Duckling, and he is driven from the farm to fend for himself. Survival, however, takes more than good looks, and the plucky little duck plods bravely into the wilderness. Review: If you look past the rather...terrifying outside of the 'duckling' the book itself is hilarious fun. The 'duckling' doesn't lose his sense of humor, and even manages to come out into good circumstances a few times. Unfortunately he had to endure a lot of hardship in order to realize his full potential. The re-telling of the story by Powell is both simple to understand, true to the source material and witty. The 'ducklings' siblings made smart aleck comments and the toad was just kind of 'yeah I knew it'. The Emperor's New Clothes Summary: In a faraway kingdom, there lives an Emperor who prizes fancy clothes above all else. He buys suit after suit made of the most expensive materials instead of tending to his threadbare kingdom. Then, one day, two traveling merchants offer to make the Emperor a special suit that has magical powers. The merchants, however, are not who they claim to be, and the suit has one major flaw -- no one can see it! Review: This fairy tale has always cracked me up. Its like high school except at least the guy on top realizes it and changes himself. The artwork here is very different from Duckling, its less cartoon-ish and softer, using what I think are watercolors (I was never very good at art). The Emperor's outfits are truly outlandish and you can see that what he isn't wearing currently is even worse. Peters does a good job fleshing out the story a little--offering a comparison montage of the Emperor vs. other sovereigns in the area as well as some sideline comments from the merchants. And in the end everyone gets exactly what they deserve. The Princess and the Pea Summary: As a young prince nears adulthood, the Queen tells him he must find a princess bride -- but not just any princess will do. Only a true princess will satisfy his mother. The young prince searches the entire kingdom, but returns home alone and sad. Late one stormy night, a mysterious woman knocks at the castle door. She claims to be a true princess, but the Queen has her doubts. So, she concocts a clever scheme to see if the princess is the real thing. Review: Hands down this was my favorite re-telling of all three. This is the same author as Emperor's New Clothes actually, but different illustrator.

October 6, 2009

Pop Culture Junkie Blog - Alea

Amazon.com: As a young prince nears adulthood, the Queen tells him he must find a princess bride -- but not just any princess will do. Only a true princess will satisfy his mother. The young prince searches the entire kingdom, but returns home alone and sad. Late one stormy night, a mysterious woman knocks at the castle door. She claims to be a true princess, but the Queen has her doubts. So, she concocts a clever scheme to see if the princess is the real thing. The illustration in The Princess and the Pea are comparable to manga. While personally I'm not yet a fan of that style it could attract a big audience. The panels are laid out for anyone regardless of age to follow along with. The reading level on this is 1.8 or Guided Reading Level: L. I thought it was exciting to see a classic tale told in a graphic novel format. Would be good for children learning to read or anyone interested in trying out a graphic novel. Having the familiar storyline to hold onto when reading a new format/genre is great I think. I expected it to be a bit longer but the short length I suppose makes sense for the reading level it is geared towards. The book also includes a short biography of Hans Christian Andersen, information about the retelling author and the illustrator, a history of The Princess and the Pea and discussion questions, writing prompts, and a glossary. The Princess and the Pea was released on August 15th. Genre: Children's Graphic Novel. 3.5/5 Stars. Review copy provided by publisher.

December 3, 2009

Teacher Librarian Magazine

Publishers learned a long time ago that they can make a quick buck off cheaply made retellings of classic (i.e.: out-of-copyright) fairy tales. As a result, librarians are automatically wary of a publisher who releases a spate of new fairy tale adaptations. Well, you don’t have to be wary of these books. Stone Arch has put its best foot forward with this new line of graphic novel adaptations of fairy tales, books that succeed on every front. The ones I’ve listed above are my particular favorites, but I haven’t seen a bad book in this new line. Cenicienta, a Spanish-language retelling of the familiar Cinderella story, is a fine example. The book is bound in a sturdy yet attractive library edition, and the high-quality paper makes the painted colors leap off the page, as for example in a panel featuring the brilliant glow from within a magical coach headed toward a certain legendary ball. The translations are also strong, with natural word choice and dialogue that pays attention to the nuances of class as the poor and the wealthy speak to one another. With these stylish new fairy tale adaptations, Stone Arch has reset the standard

July 1, 2010

Good Comics for Kids Blog, School Library Journal - Peter Gutierrez

The Emperor’s New Clothes. With this leveled title as well as The Jungle Book, The Princess and The Pea, and a version of The Ugly Duckling well suited to the Nickelodeon crowd, Stone Arch has added new energy and artistry to the business of adapting classics for young readers (although at fewer than 30 story pages, it’s a stretch to call them graphic “novels”). The backmatter includes discussion questions and writing prompts. http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/blog/540000654/post/220052222.html

January 25, 2010


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